Poisonous Plants to Dogs and Cats

Pet parenthood is vast in the US, with an estimated 68 percent of households owning some sort of pet in 2016 (according to the American Pet Products Association). Among those pets were about 90 million dogs and 94 million cats.

With an increasing amount of households adding a cat or dog, these pet owners are considering their furry friends when buying a new home.

When buying or selling a house, it’s important to understand which indoor and outdoor plants could potentially cause harm to dogs and cats. Learn more about poisonous plants to dogs and cats on Rover or browse 10 of the most common cases below.

Rhododendron and Azalea

Image by annca from Pixabay

Closely related, these two flowering bushes can cause vomiting, depression, seizure, and even coma from the consumption of just a few leaves.

Oleander

Oleander

Image by Konevi from Pixabay
Oleander is an outdoor shrub, popular for its evergreen foliage and delicate flowers. However, the leaves and flowers are extremely toxic if ingested and can cause severe vomiting, slow the heart rate and may even cause death.

Sago Palm

Sago Palm

Image by Heloisa Velloso Coutinho Helô from Pixabay

This very toxic plant adds drama to landscaping but can cause vomiting, jaundice, and abnormal fluid accumulation in the abdomen.

 

Monstera Deliciosa

Monstera Deliciosa

Image by Medana from Pixabay

This extremely popular plant, noted for its dramatic foliage and often mistakenly called a Split Leaf philodendron despite not being a member of the philodendron family of plants, can cause drooling and vomiting.

 

Begonia

Begonia

Image by zbuhdalu from Pixabay

Common as both an indoor and outdoor plant, begonias come in many varieties with lovely flowers and fascinating foliage.

 

Poinsettia

Poinsettia

Image by Angelina Ho. from Pixabay

This holiday season favorite is considered to be moderately toxic  and can cause vomiting and diarrhea. While not as harmful as it’s reputation suggests, this is still a plant to watch out for.

 

Tulips

Tulips

Image by Anelka from Pixabay

This classic flower heralds the start of spring and is commonly featured in home gardens. But the ASPCA warns that tulip bulbs are highly toxic to pets, especially cats.

 

Lilies

Lilies

Image by zoosnow from Pixabay.

Flowers in the lily family are extremely toxic to animals. Dr. Tabitha Gerehr warns:

“Lilies, although beautiful in flower arrangements and hardy in the yard, should not be in homes with cats. Lilies only cause stomach upset in dogs but can cause acute kidney failure in cats.

There are two species of lilies that present a toxicity risk and include the Lilium and Hemerocallis species. Both grow from bulbs. Common names include the Easter lily, tiger lily, Asiatic lily, stargazer lily, and day lily.

All parts of this plant are toxic to cats, including the pollen and water from a floral arrangement. Any and all exposure to a true lily by a cat warrants immediate veterinary care and hospitalization.

There are some plants that look, or have names similar to true lilies. We call them imposter lilies, but these are not from the Lilium or Hemerocallis species. The most common imposter lily in a flower arrangement is the alstroemeria or Peruvian lily.

Other common imposter lilies include amaryllis, eucharist, calla lilies, peace lilies, and waterlilies. If you are unsure what type of plant you have, contact a florist, garden center, or a Master Gardener.”

 

Foxglove (Digitalis)

Foxglove (Digitalis)

Image by Holger Schué from Pixabay.

From the Pet Poison Helpline: “Foxglove, while very beautiful with its trumpet like blossoms, are very poisonous to dogs, cats, and even humans! Foxglove contains naturally-occurring poisons that affect the heart, specifically cardenolides or bufadienolides. These poisons are called cardiac glycoside toxins, and they interfere directly with electrolyte balance within the heart muscle.”

 

English Ivy

English Ivy

Image by Dimitris Vetsikas from Pixabay.

English Ivy isn’t just invasive, it’s also contains an irritant that can cause excessive drooling, vomiting and diarrhea.

 

View Rover’s full list of poisonous plants to dogs and cats here.

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